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BluePrint + Hot Rod to the Rescue

BluePrint + Hot Rod to the Rescue

We were recently reminded of a heart-warming way that we were able to come to the rescue for a serviceman with our friends at Hod Rod Network.

Arthur Ingraham left his 1968 Firebird at a shop outside Fayetteville, North Carolina in 2009 in order to serve our country.

At the time, he was stationed at Fort Brag and was about 2,000 miles away from his home in California. As such, he had nowhere to keep the car.

He reached out to a local hot rod shop that took his money, offered the Firebird a place to stay, and while Ingraham was on active duty in Baghdad, they ruined it.

After returning from Iraq, Ingraham realized that several parts he ordered were nowhere to be found. To make matters worse, the 400ci Chevy built by the shop barely ran.

“I felt my stomach drop out when I saw the car,” Ingraham told Hot Rod Network.

“I noticed the stick welds and thought ‘I can weld better than this,’ and I’ve only welded once on my grandparent’s farm as a kid. It was so saddening to see it like that. I just wanted to be done,” he said.

After seeing the Firebird in such poor condition, the folks at Hot Rod were determined to help Ingraham make it right. They called us about a new engine and we were able to have a 383ci short block with a forged rotating assembly, oil pan, timing cover and a full roller cam valvetrain airfreighted the next day.

We also included a set of aluminum units, pre-assembled with valve springs for a hydraulic roller cam.

The end result after some elbow grease?

A beautiful Firebird that we’re sure he’s not to let out of his sight for years to come.

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BluePrint Engines Featured On Hot Rod Network: What Makes the 598 Great?

BluePrint Engines Featured On Hot Rod Network: What Makes the 598 Great?

BluePrint’s 598ci big-block Chevy was recently featured in a piece by David Freiburger on Hot Rod Network where he explores using our 598 in an unconventional way.

Freiburger hosts the show “Engine Masters” where he, Steve Brulé, and Steve Dulcich play around with engines, bust motor myths, and prove some truths.

He had an idea on a recent episode that his cohosts weren’t crazy about, but he wanted to experiment with our 598.

He writes:

“The 598 with a stock deck height uses regular parts, so I imagined a scenario where a guy has an average 396, 427, or 454 in his ride and he wants more everyday power. My question was this: what would happen if that guy just used his existing parts on top off a 598ci short-block?”

Freiburger says that the 598 is great because it’s a low-deck engine. The extra height from a popular Chevy 572 or 632 provides more weight, a tougher fit in the car, custom headers, and a dedicated intake manifold. He and his crew ran the 598 for horsepower and torque.

“Guys guessed I’d generate anything from 350 to 450 super-lame horsepower. Ultimate answer: 550 hp—weak for 598 cubes,” Freiburger wrote.

He did, however, find the torque he was looking for.

“The engine never made less than 620 lb-ft on the way to a low-rpm horsepower peak of 4,700 rpm,” he said.

This amount of torque opens up ample opportunities for those looking for a different kind of build. Overall, Freiburger believes that cubic inches still rule and that their build amplifies the way Cadillac, Buick, and Pontiac were making big torque in the 1960s.

What’s more important to you: horsepower or torque? We’d love to know! Reach out to us on our Facebook page or shoot us an email at info@blueprintengines.com.

 

 

 

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