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Ferrari Combines 21st Century Engineering with 1950s Style

Ferrari Combines 21st Century Engineering with 1950s Style

Ferrari, an Italian luxury sports car manufacturer, was founded in 1939 by Enzo Ferrari. The company is known for its participation in racing and production of fast, luxurious automobiles.

The average Ferrari comes with a six figure price tag, but that has not stopped its demand among luxury car collectors. The number of Ferraris shipped has doubled in the past decade. 

Recently, Ferrari announced “Icona,” a new vehicle line that is quite different than the modern-day luxury car.

The line will include a pair of sports cars that are a combination of 21st-century engineering and the classic racing style from the 1940s and 1950s. Both automobiles, the Monza SP1 and Monza SP2, will include a 6.5-liter V12 engine, the most powerful Ferrari has ever made.  

Both cars are are in the style of those that helped win multiple World Sports Car Championships in the 1940s and 1950s — the 1948 166 MM.

Designers Loro Piana and Berluti worked with Ferrari to design a “gentlemen-driver inspired” classic helmet, scarf, driving shoes, racing overalls, gloves, and scarf to match the “Icona” line.

Both automobiles are rumored to cost seven figures. The Guardian reports Ferrari will only produce 500 Monza SP1’s and SP2’s, which are already sold out.

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Ferris Bueller’s Iconic “Day Off” Turns 32

Ferris Bueller’s Iconic “Day Off” Turns 32
John Hughes’ feel-good film about a teen faking an illness in order to skip school and spend a carefree day exploring Chicago in a “borrowed” Ferrari turns 32 this year.

Starring Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck, and Mia Sara, the film remains a beloved classic. Chicago even celebrated the movie’s 30th anniversary with a three-day Ferris Fest that recreated events from the film.

Here are some fun facts about the infamous Ferrari used in the film:

● Hughes’ original script called for a Mercedes but went with a replica of a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT instead and used a real Ferrari for close-ups.
● It took four weeks to build the replica cars.
● They were powered by a 1963 289 ci V8, which was good for 195 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque.
● The chassis of the models was a rectangular steel tube frame that came from Indy car maker Bob Webb.
● Matthew Broderick couldn’t drive a stick shift, so one of the replicas had an automatic transmission just so he was able to drive it.
● Alan Ruck, who played Cameron, told the media that the model cars were “universally hated by the crew because they didn’t work right.” The scene in which Ferris hands over the car to the garage attendant who ultimately takes it for a joyride had to be shot more than a dozen times because the model wouldn’t start.
● One restored replica car sold for $235,000 at auction in 2013.

Bueller?...Bueller?

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